A pocket-size showcase brochure in a custom carbon fibre clam for the kinetic sculptures of Phil Price

Pocket-size brochure for the kinetic sculptures of Phil Price

A pocket-size showcase brochure in a custom carbon fibre clam for the kinetic sculptures of Phil Price.

A tight budget means doing more with less so this dual purpose business card brochure needed to show a range of kinetic works. Thinking of my paper as a screen or a stage I laid out a montage onto eighteen small panels that unfold into an informative, a4 size flier.
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Phil Price Sculpture rebrand & web makeover

Phil Price is a very successful New Zealand sculptor based in Melbourne and Christchurch who has achieved international renown for his mesmerising wind-activated kinetic works. A successful web design makeover outcome demanded a strong, clear, consistent focus so that all elements ’speak’ in a single voice that engages Phil’s audience.

For me, graphic design, at its best, tells a visual story with the same excitement, pacing and dynamics of a great movie, play, or musical composition, it evokes strong emotion.
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Title, Opto short film.

Video is kinetic graphics

Title, Opto short film.Tree of Life short film title frameVideo is kinetic graphic design, and the field of video production is a subset of the visual communication and graphic design services MagentaDot Brands offers.

Tree_of_Life_alive__Phil_Price_Kinetics-8072Both in its long history and in the explosion of visual communication in the modern era there is at times a blurred distinction/fuzzy boundary between, and overlapping of, advertising art, graphic design and fine art. This is exemplified by the “Superstars” of 60s Pop Art such as Warhol and Lichtenstein—who made stylistically refined “high-brow” fine art works derived from banal and ubiquitous consumer goods and the media/tabloid starmaker machinery of celebrity culture i.e; Campbell’s Soup, Marilyn Munroe and low-brow Comic Book Art.
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Tree of Life short film title frame

Tree of Life | Kinetic sculpture short film

Scupture short film: Tree of Life | Phil Price

The large scale, wind-activated kinetic sculpture “Tree of Life” is a major, permanent Public Artwork by Phil Price of Christchurch, New Zealand. Commissioned by Peninsula Link* and installed in December 2012 at the Cranbourne Road exit site, in the suburb of Frankston, located in Melbourne, Victoria in Australia. The Cranbourne Road site on the Langwarrin exit ramp is one of the exit points for access to the McClelland Gallery + Sculpture Park**.
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Phil Price installing the Tree of Life, Karingal, Melbourne, Australia.

Tree of Life kinetic sculpture installation

Tree of Life documentary photography (December 10–11, 2012. Cranbourne Road exit, Peninsula Link, Melbourne, Victoria, Australia)

The large scale, wind-activated kinetic sculpture “Tree of Life” is a major, permanent Public Artwork designed and made by Phil Price of Christchurch, New Zealand. The work was commissioned by Peninsula Link[1] and installed in December 2012 at the Cranbourne Road exit site, on the Langwarrin exit ramp. This is one of the exit points for access to the McClelland Gallery + Sculpture Park[2].
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Tuwing. Kinetic sculpture by Phil Price.

Phil Price Sculpture portfolio

This gallery of Phil Price Sculpture represents a selection of images form an 8 year ongoing collaboration between myself and Phil Price (Phil Price Sculpture and MagentaDot Brands). The collaboration is a work in progress that aims to progressively document both Phil’s completed kinetic works and selected work methodologies. This selection is of the best heroic photos of the wide range of Phil’s completed outdoor, wind-activated works, large, medium and small scale, from civic sculptures to private commissions in Australia and New Zealand.
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Zephyrometer wind-activated kinetic sculpture gallery

Wellington is located at the southern tip of New Zealand’s North Island and so it sits plum in the middle of the Roaring 40s, in addition the geography of narrow Cook Strait separating North & South islands funnels the strong westerly winds increasing their velocity and gustiness—which is why Wellington is known to Kiwis as “Windy Wellington”. Zephyrometer is situated in one of the capital’s windier spots en-route to the airport at Evans Bay which means it has been enjoyed by millions since 2003, and sees it regarded with some affection and pride by many Wellingtonians. My involvement with the Zephyrometer project began in 2002 when I was commissioned by Phil to illustrate a mock-up of the work and layout his successful submission to the Meridian competition.
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