Mingha Bluff box culvert install 1

Install Gallery 2 >> | Gallery 3 >> | Gallery 4 >> | Gallery 5 >>


Documentary photography project overview

Tru-Line Civil Logo. Brands for New Zealand companies, Greymouth, New Zealand.

This is the first of a series of 5 galleries documenting the install of a 10.5m reinforced concrete box culvert beneath the Christchurch – Greymouth “Tranzalpine” railway shot on the night of Sunday July 3, 2016 for client TruLine Civil’s website case study portfolio project. MagentaDot Brands documented the methodology for installing one of six under-rail reinforced concrete box culverts. Part of a package of civil works, TruLine Civil is delivering to the Mingha Bluff road realignment project.

This documentary photography major archive project for TruLine began in 2004 and since 2008 the chronicling of significant Civil Works events has been an ongoing, consistent project for MagentaDot Brands’ professional photographer Shaun Waugh, who observes:

“The client brief is to shoot photos that accurately document their civil works methodologies. By document I mean to photograph to accurately describe otherwise forbidden, difficult to access places or sets of circumstances that are hidden in plain sight. The photos range from dry records of excavation to photojournalistic, more personal evocative images of men collaborating or immersed in their work. The documentary photography of men and machines at work in the Civil Engineering field is building TruLine an archive of historical significance which was intended, from the outset, to be distributed primarily to the narrow audience of their customer base via the TruLine website case study portfolio.”

By following through with research and then writing the case studies, creating custom maps as required, the case study portfolio Shaun is developing is partly an educational in-house resource, partly a business-to-business marketing communications web platform, and with the slideshow feature and the inclusion of videos, a capabilities brochure sales tool used by TruLine’s marketing and sales team, and in competitive tender bid documents. Shaun adds:

“To the extent that students, media and the public are interested, the case studies also have a role in changing public perceptions of the work experience of modernity, of workers, their works, and the conditions of work for people, mostly men, such as drainlayers, road workers, earthmoving and other heavy machinery operators, truck drivers, and civil engineers.

Inevitably because the photography is documenting “the way we do things” in Civil Works today, it intersects with the prevalent complex of organisational culture that is good workplace Safety Culture. The photography documents that adequate attention is being paid to safety issues by capturing workers’ realistic practices for handling hazards as well as compliance to standards, rules and procedures by the workforce. It is also aimed to contribute to sharing critical information within TruLine’s workforce and management that powers the “engine” of ideal safety culture, being a constant high level of respect for anything that might defeat safety systems.”

Overview of the under-rail culvert installation

These culverts are one component of a package of civil works that TruLine is delivering to their client, Hawkins Infrastructure. The Mingha Bluff Realignment is of a section of State Highway 73 within Arthurs Pass National Park between Mingha Bluff and Rough Creek, just to the East of Arthurs Pass village. This is is a narrow, winding section of road that threads through dense mountain beech rainforest. It is challenging to drive because it consists of two opposing lanes which have a series of very tight blind corners, leading to poor visibility and other objective risks, like narrow sections between steep bluffs and drop-offs. To manage the objective risks driving the Mingha Bluff demands high levels of care and attention from all road users.

4:00–5:00pm. Site overview, commencement of excavating the 5m deep trench

From the time the Tranzalpine train passed over the under-rail culvert installation site the TruLine Civil crew had 17 hours in which to install the 10.5 m reinforced concrete box culvert and reinstate the railway. Next Mingha Bluff install gallery post 2>>


Description


Project name: Tru-Line Civil Website case studies portfolio
Client (Industry):
TruLine Civil (Construction/Contracting)
Discipline: Documentary photography / Corporate communications design / Infographics  / Technical writing / Web content management
Format: Website / Case Studies / Methodologies
Location: Mingha Bluff SH73, Arthurs Pass, New Zealand
Date: July 2016


Credits


Design firm: MagentaDot Brands
Photographer: Shaun Waugh
Client: Tru-Line Civil


Jewelled gecko: Crafty low-tech screenprint

Documentary photos of our ‘Surface Active Art-to-Wear’ auto design and printmaking work method shot in 1995

Mail_order_catalogue_1991Surface Active was an auto-printmaking, craft and design business established in 1986 by Chrissie Terpstra and Shaun Waugh. Our continuing aim as Surface Active was to celebrate wonderful, natural New Zealand—the featured creatures in our range are unique and beautiful and we try to convey something of their preciousness with our art & craft.

How did we do it? Hours spent at the drawing board, artfully rendering each separate colour to give vibrancy and detail (Shaun). Crafty low-tech, hand-pulled screenprinting techniques allowed us to create finely detailed designs, brought to life on the garment (Chrissie)—wild art to wear.

Jewelled_Gecko_mail_order_catalogue_14It was a great job and we got to do it!

We used quality, pure cotton garments, locally manufactured in Canterbury. Ours was a 100% kiwi-made product and, given the right treatment, lasted for years.

The letter below, written by Chrissie best introduces this portfolio that chronicles one of the more complex Surface Active wildlife art designs from the drawing board to screenprinted garment.

December 1991
Dear Surface Dweller,

what began 6 years ago as a printing hobby on the kitchen table has now expanded to encompass the lounge, spare bedroom, laundry, garage and the whole of the back shed.

We are committed to producing original & indigenous designs of the highest design and printing standards, providing a more interesting and beautiful product than your average tee—wearable art that celebrates the unique assets of New Zealand.

Using our Flat Earth, Low Tech printing hardware, we have painstakingly perfected our craft, printing 6 colour blends and finely detailed designs like no other can (or will). They take a bit longer to produce but the results are worth it. We are proud to be using high quality locally manufactured garments.

The overwhelming encouragement we receive from our customers tells us that we must be doing it right.

Year-round you can find Surface Active at the the Christchurch Arts Centre Market (open Sat. & Sun.), we wholesale to selected shops from North Cape to Bluff and now in our Glorious Technicolour Mail Order Catalogue, we present you the fruits of our labour.

Actively Yours,
Shaun Waugh (Boss)
Chrissie Terpstra (Bossier)

This portfolio is a work in progress, please visit again…


Credits


Documentary Photos: Thanks to a young woman, student of Fine Arts at Ilam, University of Canterbury
Crafty screenprinters: Deborah McDonald, Chrissie Terpstra
Gecko Illustration reference photos: Rod Morris

Phil Price installing the Tree of Life, Karingal, Melbourne, Australia.

Tree of Life wind-activated kinetic sculpture installation, Melbourne, Victoria, Australia,

Tree of Life documentary photography (December 10–11, 2012. Cranbourne Road exit, Peninsula Link, Melbourne, Victoria, Australia)

The large scale, wind-activated kinetic sculpture “Tree of Life” is a major, permanent Public Artwork designed and made by Phil Price of Christchurch, New Zealand. The work was commissioned by Peninsula Link[1] and installed in December 2012 at the Cranbourne Road exit site, on the Langwarrin exit ramp. This is one of the exit points for access to the McClelland Gallery + Sculpture Park[2].

Tree of Life is one of Peninsula Link’s featured major permanent sculptures and is part of Southern Way’s unique partnership with the McClelland Gallery + Sculpture Park in Langwarrin, which was established to manage the selection and installation of sculptures on Peninsula Link. Tree of Life is part of an ongoing project that will alternate sculptures on the Peninsula Link Freeway with the McClelland Gallery collection.

The work measures 10 meters high and is made of composite materials; carbon fibre, fibreglass, kevlar high temperature epoxy, along with custom, one-of-a-kind precision bearings and various kinds of steel. The large tree like form is a wind-activated kinetic sculpture that makes an obvious reference to the eucalypt—an Australian icon as such Tree of Life functions as a landmark for the natural beauty of the Mornington peninsula.

Tree of Life documentary photography

This ‘Art at Work’ project forms part of an 8 year ongoing collaboration between myself and Phil (Phil Price Kinetics and MagentaDot Brands)—a work in progress that aims to progressively document both Phil’s completed works and methodologies. Heroic photos of completed work have been shot and select, significant episodes of work process events such as this one have been journaled. This slideshow aims to visually chronicle two days work in Karingal, Melbourne of Phil, his highly skilled employees and sub-contractors—art at work.


[1] Peninsula Link: A Public Private Partnership between; Linking Melbourne Authority (Victoria State Government) / Southern Way.https://www.peninsulalink.com.au/Page…

[2[ McClelland Gallery + Sculpture Park:http://www.mcclellandgallery.com/


Description


Project name: Tree of Life installation documentary photography
Client (Industry):
 Phil Price Sculpture / PKP Kinetics (Fine arts)
Disciplines:  Photography / Video
Format: Slideshow / short film
Date: 2012


Nb. On the work safety side, it is important to point out that I comply with all Occupational Safety and Health guidelines on site and hold a current Trans-Tasman ‘Workplace Health and Safety’ card.

Gallery mock-up of shots from the Kinetics portfolio.

Phil Price Kinetics photography portfolio

This PKP Kinetics portfolio represents a selection of images form an 8 year ongoing collaboration between myself and Phil Price (Phil Price Sculpture and MagentaDot Brands). The collaboration is a work in progress that aims to progressively document both Phil’s completed works and selected work methodologies. This selection is of the best heroic photos of the wide range of Phil’s completed outdoor, wind-activated ‘Kinetics’, large medium and small scale, from civic sculptures to private commissions in Australia and New Zealand.


Description


Project name: PKP Kinetics emergent portfolio
Client (Industry): Phil Price Sculpture / PKP Kinetics (Fine arts)
Disciplines: Photography / Video
Format: Slideshow, various print media
Dates: 2006–2014


Credits


Design firm: MagentaDot Brands
Photography: Shaun Waugh

Zephyrometer wind-activated kinetic sculpture gallery

Wellington is located at the southern tip of Aotearoa / New Zealand’s North Island / Te Ika-a-Māui and sits plum in the middle of the Roaring 40s, in addition the geography of narrow Cook Strait separating North & South islands funnels the strong westerly winds increasing their velocity and gustiness—which is why Wellington is known to Kiwis as “Windy Wellington”. Zephyrometer is situated in one of the capital’s windier spots en-route to the airport at Evans Bay which means it has been enjoyed by millions since 2003, and sees it regarded with some affection and pride by many Wellingtonians. My involvement with the Zephyrometer project began in 2002 when I was commissioned by Phil to illustrate a mock-up of the work and layout his successful submission to the Meridian competition.

How it works

Zeph’ is a civic sculpture made by Christchurch artist Phil Price and was installed in 2003. It is a wind-and-gravity-activated kinetic sculpture consisting of a 3250 kg ‘balanced’ lead counterweight housed in a durable composite shell fixed to a gimbal at the base of a 26m tall needle. The gimbal consists of a pair of pivots that swivel at right angles at the base of the needle, the yoke pivot is akin to an ‘axle’ allowing rolling rotation of the 26m tall needle from 90° vertical down through to 0°/ horizontal. The yoke is in turn attached to a spindle or hub that allows it to pitch perpendicular to the rolling motion of the 26m needle.

The overall effect is that the wind causes the tall needle to swing, to ‘meter’ both wind direction and speed. But the invisible and often overlooked force that is constantly at work on the needle’s action, at the same time, is gravity, which imparts a pendulum action to the needle. Because of the gimbal gravity is always opposing the needle’s pitching and rolling movements, much like the action of a yacht’s keel on its mast. So gravity and the flex in the Spar Mast dampens down the effect of all sudden, violent shifts in wind speed and direction thereby protecting the moving parts from tremendously destructive shear forces. Gravity constantly acts on the 3250 kg counterweight making the needle relentlessly seek the rest position where the needle is perpendicular to the ground with the counterweight’s centre of gravity hanging directly beneath. Zeph’s action then is a composite of pendulum and wind vane. The clever tapered spar design means the action of the needle is self feathering, the nearer to horizontal it approaches the less windage the needle presents while at the same time the leverage exerted by the counterweight constantly opposes both pitch & roll. These clever design features have enabled Zephyrometer to ‘ride out’ the worst roaring Wellington westerlies and southerlies for over a decade.

The needle itself consists of a laminated Oregon Spar Mast skilfully sculpted by the artist to the tapered needle point over its 26m length. This spar is a single unit encased in a composite shell finished with durable automotive 2-pot lacquer. The composites used include carbon fibre, fibre-glass and kevlar. Steel, Kevlar and fibreglass are used in areas where very high strength is required such as in the housing for the steel pivot stub axles and one-of-a-kind custom-made bearings where the counterbalance weight connects to the yoke. Carbon fibre is used as much as practicable throughout the needle housing because the lighter the entire sculpture is, the more responsive it is to the wind, and the closer to a wind dance Zephyrometer’s action.

Lightning strike

Sadly, on 14 August 2014 at approximately 2:30pm, Zephyrometer was struck by lightning during an awesome southerly change that slammed into Wellington, the strike was full on and devastating, leaving the tip of the needle blasted and frayed[1]. Fortunately no one was hurt. A spokesman for Wellington City Council confirmed that the “needle” is “completely stuffed”. [2] This slideshow carousel infographic depicts the instant of the strike.[3]

This slideshow requires JavaScript.


Description


Project name: Zephyrometer portfolio
Client (Industry): Phil Price Sculpture / PKP Kinetics (Fine arts)
Discipline: Photography
Format: Slide show
Date: 2014


References

1. Zephyrometer (Wikipedia)
2. “Sculpture struck by lightning”. —Dominion Post. 14 Aug 2014
3. Lightning strikes Wellington Zephyrometer!Solomon Emett YouTube. 12 Aug 2014

Zephyrometer wind sculpture reinstallation

Zephyrometer wind activated kinetic sculpture re-install 2014

After 11 years in action the completely refurbished Zephyrometer is re-installed (April 10–11, 2014, Evans Bay, Wellington, New Zealand)

Zephyrometer_Phil_Price_Kinetics_9829Wellington is located at the southern tip of Aotearoa / New Zealand’s North Island / Te Ika-a-Māui and sits plum in the middle of the Roaring 40s, in addition the geography of narrow Cook Strait separating North & South islands funnels the strong westerly winds increasing their velocity and gustiness—which is why Wellington is known to Kiwis as “Windy Wellington”. Zephyrometer is situated in one of the capital’s windier spots en-route to the airport which means it has been enjoyed by millions since 2003, and sees it regarded with some affection and pride by many Wellingtonians. My involvement with the Zephyrometer project began in 2002 when I was commissioned by Phil to illustrate a mock-up of the work and layout his successful submission to the Meridian competition.

How it works

Zeph’ is a civic sculpture made by Christchurch artist Phil Price and was installed in 2003. It is a wind-and-gravity-activated kinetic sculpture consisting of a 3250 kg ‘balanced’ lead counterweight housed in a durable composite shell fixed to a gimbal at the base of a 26m tall needle. The gimbal consists of a pair of pivots that swivel at right angles at the base of the needle, the yoke pivot is akin to an ‘axle’ allowing rolling rotation of the 26m tall needle from 90° vertical down through to 0°/ horizontal. The yoke is in turn attached to a spindle or hub that allows the it to pitch perpendicular to the rolling motion of the 26m needle.

The overall effect is that the wind causes the tall needle to swing, to ‘meter’ both wind direction and speed. But the invisible and often overlooked force that is constantly at work on the needle’s action, at the same time, is gravity, which imparts a pendulum action to the needle. Because of the gimbal gravity is always opposing the needle’s pitching and rolling movements, much like the action of a yacht’s keel on its mast. So gravity and the flex in the Spar Mast dampens down the effect of all sudden, violent shifts in wind speed and direction thereby protecting the moving parts from tremendously destructive shear forces. Gravity constantly acts on the 3250 kg counterweight making the needle relentlessly seek the rest position where the needle is perpendicular to the ground with the counterweight’s centre of gravity hanging directly beneath.

Zephyrometer’s action in the wind is a composite of pendulum and wind vane. The clever tapered spar design means the action of the needle is self feathering, the nearer to horizontal it approaches the less windage the needle presents while at the same time the leverage exerted by the counterweight constantly opposes both pitch & roll. These clever design features have enabled Zephyrometer to ‘ride out’ the worst roaring Wellington westerlies and southerlies for over a decade.

The needle itself consists of a laminated Oregon Spar Mast skilfully sculpted by the artist to the tapered needle point over its 26m length. This spar is a single unit encased in a composite shell finished with durable automotive 2-pot lacquer. The composites used include carbon fibre, fibre-glass and kevlar. Steel, Kevlar and fibreglass are used in areas where very high strength is required such as in the housing for the steel pivot stub axles and one-of-a-kind custom-made bearings where the counterbalance weight connects to the yoke. Carbon fibre is used as much as practicable throughout the needle housing because the lighter the entire sculpture is, the more responsive it is to the wind, and the closer to a wind dance Zephyrometer’s action.

Complete refurbishment and reinstallation documentary photography

This ‘Art at Work’ project forms part of an 8 year ongoing collaboration between myself and Phil (Phil Price Kinetics and MagentaDot Brands)—a work in progress that aims to progressively document both Phil’s completed works and methodologies. Heroic photos of completed work have been shot and select, significant episodes of work process events such as this one have been journaled. This slideshow aims to visually chronicle two days work in Evans Bay, of Phil, his highly skilled employees and sub-contractors—art at work.

Zephyrometer_Lightning_Strike_frame-03Lightning strike

Sadly, on 14 August 2014 at approximately 2:30pm, Zephyrometer was struck by lightning during an awesome southerly change that slammed into Wellington, the strike was full on and devastating, leaving the tip of the needle blasted and frayed[1]. Fortunately no one was hurt. A spokesman for Wellington City Council confirmed that the “needle” is “completely stuffed”. [2] This slideshow carousel infographic depicts the instant of the strike.[3]

This slideshow requires JavaScript.


Description


Project name: Zephyrometer installation chronicle
Client (Industry): Phil Price Sculpture / PKP Kinetics (Fine arts)
Discipline: Photography
Format: Slide show
Date: 2014
Nb. On the work safety side, it is important to point out that I comply with all Occupational Safety and Health guidelines on site and hold a current Trans-Tasman ‘Workplace Health and Safety’ card.


References

1. Zephyrometer (Wikipedia)
2. “Sculpture struck by lightning”. —Dominion Post. 14 Aug 2014
3. Lightning strikes Wellington Zephyrometer!Solomon Emett YouTube. 12 Aug 2014